Gut Skin Axis Guide

What to eat for your skin?

Increasing evidence suggests that our skin and gut are connected, known as the gut-skin axis.  

An altered gut microbiome may affect our skin and may play a role in skin conditions such as acne, eczema and psoriasis. Studies have also shown that probiotics during pregnancy may decrease the risk of the infant being born with skin conditions like eczema.  

For more information, check out our article.  

We know that what we eat can affect and improve our health. So, no surprise that what we eat can also impact our skin!  

Eating a diverse range of plant-based foods. Eating more plant-based foods can have a measurable impact on your skin and healthy ageing.  

What counts as plant-based foods?  

      • Fruit and vegetables
      • Wholegrains
      • Legumes Nuts and seeds
      • Herbs and spices

 

Research has also shown that those who eat at least 30 different plant-based foods a week have a more diverse gut microbiome (which is generally used as an indicator of good gut health) than those who ate less than 10! Even more reasons to include a diverse range of plant-based foods in your diet!  

Include flavonoids (an antioxidant) in your diet that can help protect your skin. Sources include green tea, dark chocolate, fruit and vegetables.  

If you haven’t included dark chocolate in your diet before and are not sure where to start, try these amazing chocolate hazelnut clusters from Dr Michelle. Make sure to choose chocolate that has a minimum of 70% cocoa!  

https://www.thefoodeffect.co.uk/chocolate-hazelnut-clusters/    

Include omega-3 in your diet, as it can reduce inflammation. Sources include fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel and sardines, walnuts, tofu and chia seeds.  

Dr Michelle has a great recipe with salmon. This dish is great for entertaining but can also be made as single portions using salmon fillets.  

https://www.thefoodeffect.co.uk/grilled-salmon-baby-potatoes-on-a-bed-of-greens-barley/  

Include sources of lycopene in your diet (a plant chemical), that can protect your skin from UV damage. Lycopene is the pigment that gives red and pink fruits, such as tomatoes, watermelons and pink grapefruit, their characteristic colour. To increase the absorption of lycopene include it with a fat source (like extra virgin olive oil)!  

Shakshuka is packed with tomatoes as well as healthy fats. Check out Dr Michelles recipe for her super easy shakshuka, https://www.thefoodeffect.co.uk/easiest-ever-shakshuka/